This is exactly how I felt the first time I didn’t go to church.

This is exactly how I felt the first time I didn’t go to church.

(Source: kittygomeow, via afternoonsnoozebutton)

thattrollwiththehorns:

mrsomnix:

thelaststarbunny:

captorvatingmituna:

ilikecomicstoo:

sigh.

This needs more notes ._.

Here I am reblogging this from myself because I think everyone who breathes needs to see it and MAKE IT STOP.

This is a joke. He interviews people and makes jokes. Calm your feministic self down.

Get out. If you honestly think that, I want you to unfollow me right now.

That guy isn’t joking, and if he is, its a god awful joke, and has no right to be supported. If he’s joking, then its an example of institutionalized misogyny in comedy that has been built up over the years and decades past, and it is not acceptable.

I am uncomfortable with those jokes, and I’m a GUY. It isn’t ok to do to ANYBODY, let alone people who are trying to enjoy a convention and cosplay a character they like. This is disgusting and shit like this needs to stop, from all angles, even someone trying to make a shitty joke.

Women are not objects, and they should not be treated as such.

If you think this guy is funny for doing that, and if you honestly think I need to calm down for being “feministic” in this issue, then you need to unfollow me, because I have no intention of stopping. And now that you’ve drawn attention to yourself with this, I highly suggest you don’t bring it up again.

In fact, I recommend you take a good long look at yourself. Take a look at how you are treated, and how other people around you are treated. If you think this is comedic and funny, you need to check yourself, because its not. If you think joking about women in such a way that demeans them and objectifies them, you need to check yourself.

And above all else, if you think someone standing up for equality of women and the cessation of this shitty behavior from EVERYONE, not just this comedian, warrants someone like YOU telling that person to “calm [their] feministic self down”, then you need to reconsider your priorities in life.

(Source: marlene, via feminspire)

buzzfeed:

buzzfeedent:

These women country singers imagined a world where men are the sexy props

This video is perfect.

poetessinthepit:

PSA: Big corporations putting feel good feminist messages in their advertisements wont result in women’s liberation as much as it will result in goading liberal minded folks to buy more shampoo or whatever. There’s no point in fawning over these commercials.

(via skeletonqueen69)

newsweek:

Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors one finds collected on sites like Damn You Autocorrect. But despite the inadvertent hilarity, the real marvel of our mobile text-correction systems is how astoundingly good they are. It’s not too much of an exaggeration to call autocorrect the overlooked underwriter of our era of mobile prolixity. 

Without it, we wouldn’t be able to compose windy love letters from stadium bleachers, write novels on subway commutes, or dash off breakup texts while in line at the post office. Without it, we probably couldn’t even have phones that look anything like the ingots we tickle—the whole notion of touchscreen typing, where our podgy physical fingers are expected to land with precision on tiny virtual keys, is viable only when we have some serious software to tidy up after us. Because we know autocorrect is there as brace and cushion, we’re free to write with increased abandon, at times and in places where writing would otherwise be impossible. Thanks to autocorrect, the gap between whim and word is narrower than it’s ever been, and our world is awash in easily rendered thought. 

The Fasinatng … Frustrating … Fascinating History of Autocorrect | Gadget Lab | WIRED

newsweek:

Invoke the word autocorrect and most people will think immediately of its hiccups—the sort of hysterical, impossible errors one finds collected on sites like Damn You Autocorrect. But despite the inadvertent hilarity, the real marvel of our mobile text-correction systems is how astoundingly good they are. It’s not too much of an exaggeration to call autocorrect the overlooked underwriter of our era of mobile prolixity.

Without it, we wouldn’t be able to compose windy love letters from stadium bleachers, write novels on subway commutes, or dash off breakup texts while in line at the post office. Without it, we probably couldn’t even have phones that look anything like the ingots we tickle—the whole notion of touchscreen typing, where our podgy physical fingers are expected to land with precision on tiny virtual keys, is viable only when we have some serious software to tidy up after us. Because we know autocorrect is there as brace and cushion, we’re free to write with increased abandon, at times and in places where writing would otherwise be impossible. Thanks to autocorrect, the gap between whim and word is narrower than it’s ever been, and our world is awash in easily rendered thought.

The Fasinatng … Frustrating … Fascinating History of Autocorrect | Gadget Lab | WIRED

Nearly two out of every three minimum wage workers in this country is a woman. And many of those women are the primary caregivers in their households. And yet we’re still trapped in this cycle in which conservative lawmakers and others on the right ignore all of this in favor of platitudes about personal responsibility and talking points that will do absolutely nothing to help working parents — particularly working mothers — care for themselves and their families.

statedept:

Have you heard about the seven women mountain climbers from Nepal, who climbed Mt. McKinley (Denali) in Alaska? Together this all-women team has climbed six of the seven summits of the highest mountains on each of the seven continents. Yesterday, Secretary Kerry met with the Seven Summits Women’s team in efforts to promote women’s empowerment, education, and environmental awareness. http://go.usa.gov/5Yqw 

ericboydblog:

six word poem by Eric Boyd.

How cool is this? I’m always so excited when Coffee-For-Closers turns one of my six worders into these video game art pieces. Just a neat thing to see done to the words.

theweekmagazine:

The best desserts to eat at your desk

Give your lunch dessert the respect it deserves

She was 18 years old, a freshman, and had been on campus for just two weeks when one Saturday night last September her friends grew worried because she had been drinking and suddenly disappeared.

Around midnight, the missing girl texted a friend, saying she was frightened by a student she had met that evening. “Idk what to do,” she wrote. “I’m scared.” When she did not answer a call, the friend began searching for her.

In the early-morning hours on the campus of Hobart and William Smith Colleges in central New York, the friend said, he found her — bent over a pool table as a football player appeared to be sexually assaulting her from behind in a darkened dance hall with six or seven people watching and laughing. Some had their cellphones out, apparently taking pictures, he said.

Later, records show, a sexual-assault nurse offered this preliminary assessment: blunt force trauma within the last 24 hours indicating “intercourse with either multiple partners, multiple times or that the intercourse was very forceful.” The student said she could not recall the pool table encounter, but did remember being raped earlier in a fraternity-house bedroom.

The football player at the pool table had also been at the fraternity house — in both places with his pants down — but denied raping her, saying he was too tired after a football game to get an erection. Two other players, also accused of sexually assaulting the woman, denied the charge as well. Even so, tests later found sperm or semen in her vagina, in her rectum and on her underwear.

It took the college just 12 days to investigate the rape report, hold a hearing and clear the football players. The football team went on to finish undefeated in its conference, while the woman was left, she said, to face the consequences — threats and harassment for accusing members of the most popular sports team on campus.

A New York Times examination of the case, based in part on hundreds of pages of disciplinary proceedings — usually confidential under federal privacy laws — offers a rare look inside one school’s adjudication of a rape complaint amid a roiling national debate over how best to stop sexual assaults on campuses.

Whatever precisely happened that September night, the internal records, along with interviews with students, sexual-assault experts and college officials, depict a school ill prepared to evaluate an allegation so serious that, if proved in a court of law, would be a felony, with a likely prison sentence. As the case illustrates, school disciplinary panels are a world unto themselves, operating in secret with scant accountability and limited protections for the accuser or the accused.

At a time of great emotional turmoil, students who say they were assaulted must make a choice: Seek help from their school, turn to the criminal justice system or simply remain silent. The great majority — including the student in this case — choose their school, because of the expectation of anonymity and the belief that administrators will offer the sort of support that the police will not.

Yet many students come to regret that decision, wishing they had never reported the assault in the first place.